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Before we begin with the list of the best single cam bow, let’s understand the purpose of the cam? Why it is needed?

The cam is a tiny wheel positioned on either the top or bottom limb.

Maintaining a bow at full draw without a cam or cams can be difficult since you must pull the whole weight of the bow. This is where the cam system comes in to save the day. With less burden, you can now execute a complete draw.

A riser, thread, cable system, and cams are all part of a compound bow. During the drawing and release of an arrow, the bow’s cams regulate the draw weight. The cam’s form can influence how simple or difficult it is to draw the bow, and also how much power it can store and discharge when fired.

Single Cam

The limbs of single cam bows feature a single cam or wheel. This single cam is found on one of the bow’s limbs. The single cam bows function in a similar fashion to a dual cam bow in terms of mechanics. Here are some of the advantages and disadvantages of using a single cam.

Advantages of using the single cam:

  • It doesn’t readily get out of tune: You won’t have to worry about any changes in the flight of your arrow occurring more frequently; hence, your arrow will not fly astray. This also makes it simpler to stay in sync.
  • The sole cam bow is quieter than the twin cam bow: This implies that if you’re going bow hunting, you’ll have a higher chance of avoiding disturbing or alerting your prey after you’ve released your arrow. This also implies that once you release the arrow, you have a higher probability of reaching your target.
  • It is more accurate: Because the sole cam bow does not readily get out of tune, you may enjoy a more accurate aim at your goal than with the dual cam bow.

Disadvantages of Single Cam Bows:

  • Single cam bows are a little weaker than dual cam bows, so if you would like a more powerful draw, you’ll have to work a little harder than with a double cam bow.

Best Single Cam Bow

Here is the list of popular single cam bow

The Diamond Outlaw

The Diamond Outlaw is one of those low-cost bows that will appeal to a wide range of shooters in 2011. It boasts a good mix of speed, accuracy, and useful features, making it a good pick. It’s equipped with the R.A.K system, which provides you a bow that’s already tuned in and ready to fire, making it an even more appealing option this year.

The outlaw is a high-quality, lightweight forged aluminium one-piece riser. This rig’s limbs are made of one-piece strong glass with a parallel limb pattern.

Its grip is composed of a composite material and is single piece, giving you a warm feeling in chilly conditions.

Mathews Switchback XT

The Mathews Switchback XT is a high-end model of the Mathews Switchback family. The Mathews Switchback XT is a link between the two previous versions in the series: the least forgiving and quicker Mathews Switchback and the slower but more lenient Mathews Switchback LD. 

The Switchback XT is a forgiving, silent, and small bow. When it comes to shooting, this rig is even finer than the classic Switchback, while still providing a wonderful mix of speed, quietness, and forgiving. Because of its low 31″ axle-to-axle length, it’s suitable for both tree stand and blind hunting.

Mathew’s Straight-line XT Cam technology is responsible for stated IBO rates of up to 315 fps. This is a non-modular cam mechanism, which means separate cams are needed for varied draw lengths. Draw lengths range from 25 to 30 inches, with half-inch increments.

Mathews Z7

The Mathews Z7 was created to reflect a balance of speed and finesse. Excluding the Reezen 6.5 and 7.0, which are rather aggressive to handle, practically all Mathews single cam bows are incredibly smooth to draw. That’s why Mathews engineers created the Z7, a finer drawing bow capable of generating blistering IBO velocities.

The new Gridlock Riser, a well-balanced, lighter, and sturdy platform that delivers exceptional performance, is among the most eye-catching Z7 elements. The GridLock Riser is unlike any other riser since it is pierced with many isometric cuts throughout its structure. 

Mathews engineers were able to lower the total weight of the bow by reducing the quantity of material used while maintaining stiffness and integrity.

Bear Carnage

The Bear Carnage is a high-quality bow with a smooth draw and excellent shooting ability. It offers a number of improvements over last year’s Attack. When fired, this bow is quick, smooth, and almost vibration-free. The Carnage was, without a doubt, at the top of the priority list of outstanding bows for 2011.

The Carnage comes in a few different finishes. It’s available in Realtree AP or the Shadow edition, which is Bear’s take on the renowned “black out” finish. Overall, the craftsmanship on this bow appears to be of great quality, and the camouflaged choice is detailed.

This bow’s riser has a skeleton design, as Bear describes it. It’s a longer, machined aluminium riser that provides a more tuned feel.

Mathews Heli-m

The flagship bow for Mathews’ 2012 collection is a featherweight at 3.5 pounds, making it the lightest bow on the market currently. The lightweight build, on the other hand, might account for part of the shock experienced while firing this feather weight. 

The shock isn’t tremendous; it’s just a little more obvious than what Mathews has come to be regarded for. This isn’t a significant departure from Mathews’ earlier offerings; they just started slashing weight and pumping out the lighter-than-air Heli-M.

Additional Recommendations for Buying Compound Bows

You might go to a store that has a large selection. This will help you choose which aspects are most appealing to you. There are a multitude of choices available, and the best way to test the waters is to visit a shop. You’ll want to get a feel for your new buy, especially if you’re a newbie.

The simplest way to figure out which draw you choose is to go to a hunting equipment store. You’ll be able to experience if you have sufficient strength to utilise a compound bow with a higher draw power and assess cam designs by pulling on the string.